Big closet or not, it’s still a closet.

 

I decided to write about the status of LGBT rights and legitimacy in Bangladesh. Bangladesh is perceived to be one of the few Islamic states which exercises considerable tolerance towards the issue of homosexuality. Practicing homosexuality is strictly prohibited by the law under Section 377 A of the CrPC (Criminal Penal Code).The law says- “Whoever voluntarily has carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman, or animal, shall be punished with imprisonment for life, or with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to ten years, and shall be liable to fine.” In the Guardian Article we read, What’s it like being LGBT around the world?, they described a reality in which people of LGBT status live in a “comfortable closest”. They call it “comfortable” because the actual actions of same-sex relations are not policed well and are normally looked over. However, those citizens are still crammed into a closet, nonetheless! I think this really draws into the E. Patrick Johnson’s theories and the idea of Quare theory. There’s explicit restriction of personal expression and processes. How do you feel about this? It it worth fighting the traditions and outing oneself even if there’s loose enforcement? Things are slowly changing however, I have difficulty imagining real changes being made. How much of an impact do you think this restriction has on civilians of LGBT status? Do you think it would be best to live comfortably and not combat the tradition? Even with the support of many human rights groups and individuals, I’m not sure it will be enough to overturn traditional convictions. But, you never know until you try. Right?

Sexual Orientation Laws in Russia

It’s kind of no surprise to me that Russia does not promote the LGBTQ community and they have laws limiting freedom of expression. When I think of Russia, I always think of a rigid community that doesn’t accept anything that’s not considered “normal”. But like we’ve said in this class, there’s no clear definition “normal”. I’m not really sure what Russia does and does not like overall. I’m sure it’s ok for the women there to dress in a tomboyish fashion but when the opposite occurs, I guess all hell is going to break loose. I know the US sometimes has some backwards opinions but they seem much farther behind us when it comes to acceptance. It was also sad to see the firsthand account from the drag queen from the RuPaul’s drag race video that we watched in class. It was heartbreaking to see what the one drag queen had to go through just because the way he was dressed didn’t match up with the typical male outfits in Russia. Then to hear that the other contestant who lived there for a couple years had to censor or hold back everything he did or said. It kind of reminds me of this other thing that I saw regarding one of my favorite youtubers went through. Her name is Gigi Gorgeous and she’s a transgender woman. She was completely humiliated in a Dubai airport  for just the same reasons. She made a whole video about it where she talks about her experience and just sounds like she was so scared because she had no clue what was going to happen to her and no one would give her any information. When she finally got to catch up with the group she was with, she was so overwhelmed to realize that she was going to be ok. This is no way to treat human beings. I mean I understand not everywhere is equal on the laws for the LGBTQ but we’re all still people. I just don’t get why people tend to treat the others that are “different” than what they are used to, then they are treated as if they aren’t real living human beings. The end result of these people getting detained at airports always ends badly and needs to stop. Or there’s got to be a better way to go about it.