Who determines a”bad feminist”

Personally I wouldn’t identify myself as a feminist, but I can relate to feminists on certain topics. For an example the Women’s March on Washington against Trump; no matter who you were everyone came together to fight back and gain back the rights that shouldn’t be taken in the first place. Women 100% have control over their bodies. After listening to the TED talk it made me question the idea of what qualifies someone to be a feminist. Do they have to talk a specific, have a specific look… ?No a feminist can act or look any way; you could walk past millions of feminists a day and not even realize it. (Sorry if this may offend some)There is no such thing as a “perfect feminist”. Referring back to Gay’s speech just because a woman doesn’t want to do the “manly work” doesn’t mean that they are a “fake” feminist it just means that they are a normal person. The different readings from multiple perspectives of what constitutes a feminist made me come to the conclusion that no one person can tell you if you are or aren’t a feminist. As Roxanne Gay says “we are people with different genders, backgrounds, sexualities… but we need to accept everyone and close the gap”. Feminism is an ongoing behavior and we all need accept one another and keep striving to the top. Within the “Dig Deep Reading” Sandberg says that “women need to seek high level corporate jobs.. women will improve once there are more women everywhere”. Women are women and we need to accept and encourage all instead of competing with one another. Feminism isn’t a scary or “unapproachable” term that many people believe it to be; its just people coming together for equal rights.

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5 thoughts on “Who determines a”bad feminist”

  1. Sheryl Sandberg does not assume a realistic attitude as she preaches to women on ‘how to succeed’. She generalizes her audience, disregarding minorities and other factors including financial status, parenting dynamics etc. I did not read her book but I did watch one of her many TED Talks. Sandberg preaches to women as a Home Economics instructor would talk to women in the 1960s. She focuses on activities that conventionally make a woman sound perfect, for example, eat clean and light, dress sophisticatedly, exercise often, all while overachieving in the public and private sphere. She conforms to the patriarchy rather than affect change and she completely submits to the idea that women have to work twice as hard to excel in life, just to obtain the role of a man.

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  2. I agree with your point about needing to accept everyone and agree that feminism is about equal rights for all. Amanda also makes an interesting point that i agree with in the comments about Sandberg conforming to the patriarchy. I think the best approach would be to tell women they can do whatever they would like to do, and whatever feels right. When she tells women to live in a specific way, it’s not really liberating women.

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  3. I enjoyed reading your post because I also believe that there is no such thing as a “perfect feminist.” I too am all for the “manly work” not because I’m not a feminist, or because I believe women can’t do “manly work”, but because I feel as though some things are better off as work for men whether it be taking out the trash, changing oil in your car, etc. I guess since I’ve grown up in a house where my dad and brother do the outside chores and me, my sisters, and mom usually do the inside chores I am just accustomed to asking my brother or dad to help fix my car or help me do manly work. I don’t think that makes me not a feminist because I do believe 100% women can do anything men can do, however, some things I feel as though all feminists wouldn’t mind a man doing certain things for them in the end.

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  4. I do consider myself a feminist (in my head), however when I try to define why or how I am I don’t know what to say. When I heard Roxanne Gay’s TED Talk and her description of being a “bad feminist” I identified with it because I got where she was coming from but I don’t full identify with her reasonings why she calls her self that. So I like to think of myself somewhere in the middle, (a mediocre feminist). I’veneer out loud though said, “I AM A FEMINIST,”and I don’t know if its because I’m scared of the bad connotations along with it or if its because I feel like a need for equality in my brain doesn’t qualify as a term like feminist? Maybe some of both. I think being raised Unitarian Universalist, I was raised with certain values that make me think being a feminist shouldn’t be something you announce because it was already a part of who I was and what people taught me was naturally right.

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  5. I enjoyed reading this post because for me, I never considered myself a feminist, but now am realizing that that is not true. I thought I wasn’t a feminist because I wasn’t outward or vocal on my beliefs and didn’t fit into a “stereotypical feminist”. When watching the TED talk on bad feminism, I found myself relating to more things she was talking about than I thought I would ever while watching someone speak on feminism. It opened my eyes that I can still do things that Gay did as well, such as enjoy wrap music or watch that movie that is degrading to a female image, but still want rights and equality for women and that it is okay to fall somewhere in the middle of a huge spectrum of feminists. I learned from these readings and especially the Ted talk that I can be a bad feminist, which means that I am a feminist. Doing somethings that a “bad feminist” might do doesn’t cancel out the things I want or believe for women or take away my small side of being a feminist. This all made me realized that I am more of a bad feminist than no feminist at all.

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